Strongest storm of the year targets Philippines

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whiskeygalore
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Strongest storm of the year targets Philippines

Post #1 by whiskeygalore » Fri Nov 08, 2013 6:05 am

This image from the European Envisat satellite shows Super Typhoon Haiyan in the Pacific Ocean. The storm is named after the Chinese word for a type of seabird, and is also called Super Typhoon Yolanda in the Philippines. It seems like that nation is not going to remember this name fondly.

At present, this storm is the strongest storm of the year and may, before it makes landfall, compete for the title of strongest storm ever. The details on this storm are staggering; it packs sustained winds of 305 kph (190 mph) and has gusts up to 370 kph (230 mph). Those wind speeds make it the strongest storm since 1979’s super-typhoon Tip and nearly the strongest since satellite measurements began. Its estimated central pressure has fallen below 900 mb; only the 2nd western-Pacific storm to do so in the last 22 years....
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Strongest storm of the year targets Philippines

This image from the European Envisat satellite shows Super Typhoon Haiyan in the Pacific Ocean. The storm is named after the Chinese word for a type of seabird, and is also called Super Typhoon Yolanda in the Philippines. It seems like that nation is not going to remember this name fondly.

At present, this storm is the strongest storm of the year and may, before it makes landfall, compete for the title of strongest storm ever. The details on this storm are staggering; it packs sustained winds of 305 kph (190 mph) and has gusts up to 370 kph (230 mph). Those wind speeds make it the strongest storm since 1979’s super-typhoon Tip and nearly the strongest since satellite measurements began. Its estimated central pressure has fallen below 900 mb; only the 2nd western-Pacific storm to do so in the last 22 years.

It also is quite large; clouds from it are reportedly covering 2/3 of the Philippines at this point. It is expected to make landfall early in the day on Friday close to the time this post appears.

On top of the wind speed this storm is taking an exceptionally dangerous track; it seems poised for the strongest part of the storm surge to hit Leyte Gulf directly. The gulf is somewhat surrounded by mountains but the low-lying areas near the coast are home to several hundred thousand people and the gulf itself is shaped like a funnel open towards the ocean in the direction of the approaching storm. That shape makes this gulf a perfect place to amplify the storm surge when it makes landfall.

Areas in the path of the storm are expecting large rainfalls which will likely cause flooding and additional landslides. This is the 5th category 5 storm of the year, the highest number of category 5 storms in a year since 2009. This will also be the 5th named storm and 4th typhoon to strike the Philippines this year.

“Nothing burns like the cold.”

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